Dave Olson’s Social Marketing Kung Fu, Green Belt: Building a Posse

Owly at Launch Party 9 Vancouver

On Wednesday, June 29th, we welcomed back Dave Olson, Community Wrangler at Hootsuite, for Social Marketing Kung Fu session number four at Bootup HQ, entitled Building a Posse.

Rockstars, Gardeners, & Interns

Dave talked about three different types of people that want to be a part of your posse: rockstars, gardeners, and interns. They all have different motivations for being a part of your community, and have different talents to offer you, thus, they should be rewarded accordingly. You must provide them with some restraints, though, so that no one is speaking on behalf of your brand but you.

  • Rockstars are the ones who are concerned with their personal brand, and what they get out of their relationship with you. A great example of a rockstar is a high profile blogger. If they help promote your product online, they are going to want to be rewarded publicly online, so Dave’s suggestion is to thank them on the blog with trackback links, pictures (flickr), twitter mentions, etc. Plus, everyone loves some good swag every now and again.
  • Gardeners are the power users of your product that do things for you because they are fans, and they care about the product. This might be a developer who discreetly tips you off about a bug or glitch in your system, or a keener who makes a video tutorial on a product you just launched. Dave’s tip for rewarding these types of people is obviously a huge personal THANK YOU, and a mail delivered package of company swag, to make them feel like the special person that they are.
  • Interns are exactly what you think they are. Recently graduated from university, looking for a career, and wanting to be a part of an awesome company. Dave’s advice on interns (and he’s an expert, he’s had about 20 at Hootsuite, and calls himself the “intern whisperer”) is to NOT treat them like interns. First of all, give them a title that means something, not just “intern.” Don’t make them go get your coffee. There are always going to be mundane tasks in every job, but give them inspiring tasks to feel like they are doing a real job. In the process, you will find out what they excel at. They are going to be an extension of your company, and they’re going to be talking about your company.

Twitter Lists

Hootsuite uses twitter lists to monitor these different types of people and their conversations. Using just search terms and hashtags gets too messy and too complicated. One thing Dave told us, is that when he finds someone who has said something interesting about Hootsuite on twitter, he will go to their profile and find out: who they are (even check their LinkedIn profile), where they’re from, what do they tweet about, and who are they having conversations with. He then jumps into their conversation to “lob the tennis ball,” and then waits for them to hit it back.

HootUps

A new initiative Hootsuite is working on is organizing Hootups (like a tweetup, but for Hootsuite users), and they have encouraged people to start organizing their own Hootups. If you organize an event, and send an e-mail to Hootsuite telling them about it, they’ll send you some hootkits (swag) to give away as door prizes. Obviously these people are going to be posting pictures, tweeting and blogging about the event, so it’s a wicked way to get people talking about your product.

Talk is Cheap

Another thing Dave pointed out is that it doesn’t require a lot of money to be an influential brand. Hootsuite was named one of the top 5 influential companies at SXSW in 2011, and the biggest expense for the conference was for handing out free beer koozies. They didn’t do any major stunts like sponsor parties and give away free booze, but they DID pay someone to wear the Owly mascot suit every day during the conference. See, marketing can be cheap!

Tips & Takeaways

Lastly, I’ll leave you with some of the main takeaways that stood out to me from Dave’s talk:

  • “Hi. You Matter. We’re Listening.”
  • What makes people want to feel a part of your community? Find out and amplify their story.
  • Inspiration is the key to motivation.
  • Amplify your success to make more!

Please share any ideas you have or takeaways we may have missed in the comments below.

Missed SMKF? Find the Notes here:

Our notes from the last couple of talks can be found here and here, and Dave posts all of his notes on Tumblr for those that have missed the previous talks.

 

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Social Marketing Kung Fu, Purple Belt with Dave Olson

Dave Olson

Photo by Kris Krug

On Wednesday, April 27th, I sat in on my first startup talk at the Bootup Garage. Dave Olson, Director of Marketing at Hootsuite, came in to do his third talk in a series aptly named Social Marketing Kung Fu (#smkf).

In January, Dave started off with Social Marketing Kung Fu, White Belt (Maura’s notes from that session are here), then in March, he came in for the Yellow Belt – “Listening Everywhere” session.

Dave is always a joy to listen to – I’ve seen him speak at a few different conferences – so I was eager to hear what he had to say in session number three: Social Marketing Kung Fu, Purple Belt – Release Day. His talks are always full of interesting tidbits and useful information, and this one was definitely no different.

I jotted down a few notes to share with you, but you can also find Dave’s notes on getting your Purple Belt here.

What to Release

  • Should be something substantial, or a few things bundled together and released around the same time.
  • Code names for product releases are always smart, as they’re memorable.

Know Your Coverers

  • Reach out to the media that you want to cover your story: RT them, comment on their stories, add them to twitter lists, etc.
  • Get to know them, and what they write about.
  • Personally invite them to join your media e-mail list.
  • When you send them info, make their life easy. Respect their time.
  • Spoon feed them the story, but never be condescending.

Craft Stories

  • Take 3 important talking points, and craft them into different forms.
  • Tell them why your story matters!
  • Get quotes from your customers, not your CEO (unless it’s a special circumstance, where a quote from the CEO is appropriate).
  • Putting a boiler plate “About” section at the bottom of a press release is unnecessary and a waste of space. Link to your website/blog instead.
  • Tune your vocab. Make it active, not passive. Lose the buzz words, and keep your vocab as consistent as possible.
  • Include image(s) to support your story, so they use your image and not their own.

Line up Dominoes &/or House of Cards

  • Constantly keep your media kit up to date. If you have one page on your website, this should be it.
  • Thursday before the release: Send an internal memo to your team to share the master plan. Include your 3 main talking points, who you’re telling, and why it matters.
  • Monday 1PM: Local press release, & media preview e-mail. Include assets, like an infographic, if possible. Make them feel like they are getting the story first.
  • You can also send a preview e-mail to your key clients, to keep them in the loop, and ultimately, make them feel special.
  • Tuesday 5AM: Scheduled blog post. Make everything point here, so it answers any questions people may have. This way you are controlling the conversation.
  • Next comes Twitter & Facebook updates, a general e-mail to clients, and a wire release (with links, tags, etc.) Keep the Facebook update light and airy. You don’t want it to become your main feedback channel.
  • Tuesday 9AM: Make sure your dominoes have fallen into place! You can also update any LinkedIn groups, Forums, Q & A sites like Quora, Formspring, etc.
  • Tuesday 11AM: Optionally, you can host a webinar, an hour at most, to go over any details that go along with the release.
  • Schedule any interviews requested by the media.

Then…

LISTEN
REPLY
THANK
SHARE
REPEAT

Prepare for the haters

  • If you comment on articles right away and thank the author for sharing your story, you may prevent a good portion of negative comments, because they know you’re there listening.
  • Prepare some stock comment copy for the trolls, so that you don’t take their criticism personally.

Finally

  • Thursday: Send a News Round-up. Share your favourite coverage from the release. If someone has created a video tutorial on your product, make sure to include that. Don’t forget to trackback to those articles.

Next month, Dave O will be back for the fourth installment of Social Marketing Kung Fu at the Garage, so be sure to come check it out.

After the talk, most of us headed over to the Alibi Room for Startup Drinks. Sign up for the Bootup Meetup Group if you haven’t yet, so you don’t miss out on the next one!

Additionally, if you have any other notes or tips that I have missed, please feel free share them here.